Tag: Ethics

Bioengineering Ethics

Bioengineering Ethics

There are ethical issues related to bioengineering. A topic that is always up for debate is the science of cloning. Cloning is the replication of a life form by creating copies of DNA fragments. Cloning is similar to making a copy of a computer file. It is meant to be an exact replica of the original life form.

Many religious organizations oppose cloning due the very nature of the science. Many religious beliefs consider each person unique with each person or life form being created by a higher power, such as God. Cloning basically takes the place of God, as humans become the manufacturer of life instead of nature. Currently 13 states ban any form of reproductive cloning and 3 states prohibit use of public funds for any cloning related activities. There are currently no federal laws that prohibit cloning.
Human dignity is a common argument against cloning. The fact that cloning is not dignified, is enough for the catholic church to condemn cloning. It’s also enough for Canada to prohibit the following: Cloning humans, cloning stem cells, growing human embryos for research purposes, sex selection, and buying or selling of embryos, sperm, eggs or other human reproductive material.
Cloning for the greater good of humanity does not bring as much defiance. In fact, cloning has great benefits in the form of crops. Cloning can be used to improve the quality of the crops that we eat. It makes the plants resistant to herbicides, pest damage, infections and diseases. Cloned plants such as wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato and others have been produced and are ready to be introduced into agriculture in the new future. Cloning genetically engineered animals can also be beneficial for highly efficient food production.

Cloning animals is still a highly inefficient process. The success rate ranges from .1 to 3 percent. So for every 1000 tries only around 30 will be successful. Therefore its simply not worth the effort at this point.

References:
The University of Utah. Cloning. Retrieved from http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/tech/cloning/
Wikipedia. Cloning. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloning#Ethical_issues_of_cloning
Wikipedia. Biological Engineering. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_engineering

The Gods Must be Crazy – Ethical Dilemas

The Gods Must be Crazy – Ethical Dilemas

When the villagers were fighting over the Coke bottle, that scenario instantly reminding me of my 3 kids when they fight over 1 important object. Usually that object is a video game system, or the iPad. Car trips can be the worst, especially when only 1 device is charged, and the 3 of them have to share it. With the age differences (9,6,3) some children are more irrational than others, which usually escalates the problem. My Wife and I often view these devices as evil, and would gladly walk to the edge of the Earth to throw them away.

At the end of the movie I thought it was interesting when Mr. Steyn was trying to give a reward to Xi (The Bushman). Xi didn’t know what to do with the money, but Steyn knew that giving a reward was the ethical thing to do. It was somewhat of a dilema for both of them since neither of them were familiar with each others cultures.

Another culture clash in the movie came when Xi was hungry from his walk, and was going to eat one of the goats that belonged to somebody. Xi obviously didn’t know that goats could belong to somebody. He was so nieve that he was obilivous to the fact that he was making the people angry. The guard ending up shooting him in the leg for it. Xi only had good intentions, and was shot for it.

I was a little disturbed when the people came into the political office and started shooting. That was a werid part of the movie. I’m not even sure why that scene was there. It’s almost like there was two different movies. One was the teacher going to the tribe or city, and the other was the military aspect of it. Maybe there was even three separate parts, if you include the Bushman Coke bottle. Now that I’m typing this out, it makes sense that there was three different stories.

It’s interesting how the three stories converge at the end. Almost like a Seinfield episode. When you think about ethical and moral issues that came up in the end of the movie, I think of when the Bushman came down disguised as a prisioner, and put the guards to sleep. It goes to show how one’s morals can change over time. Before the Xi’s journey, I’m not sure if he would sneak up to a mob of people and put some of them to sleep. I think that he realized that there are evil people in the world. Xi certainly discovered that after the stabbing at the goat farm.

From what I’ve learned about morals, it really depends on what you’ve been taught during your childhood. Morals come from your values, and values are taught by the people you grow up with. Throughout this movie, and every movie in existence, there are many moral and ethical issues that come up.

There was a small ethical dilema for Mr. Steyn when Kate was stuck in the tree with only her underwear on. He tried to be polite and not look at her, but she also needed his help. Akward situation for Mr. Steyn and Kate.

When is it ethical to quit a job?

When is it ethical to quit a job?

Is there a certain period of time where one should stay at a job, even if they don’t enjoy what they’re doing?
Are there certain circumstances that gives the company a good excuse to leave a job? An example would be if the company got bought out by a larger company that brings a lot of red tape and process.

Ethics in College Sports

Ethics in College Sports

Often times you’ll hear coaches say, “We’re doing it the right way”. That was the quote from the head coach of the Ole Miss football program after they landed the #1 football recruit in the nation yesterday. I’ve also heard coaches say, “We run a clean program. We do things the right way.” So my question is, is this just a front for perception, or is there really a belief that “doing things the right way” will get their programs to where they want them to be.

I know that message was cast out a lot when Todd Lichligther was the b-ball coach at Iowa. Everybody always said what a clean, good program he ran. But he ultimately got fired because the team was so horrible. But he did the it the right way, and he’s not coaching division 1 anymore.